COVID-19 Update: State of Texas, November 18, 2020

Novel Coronavirus: COVID-19

We have heard disturbing reports from El Paso, Texas, and from the national media on the rising new novel coronavirus infections nationwide. Let’s see what the numbers are for the state. . . from the Texas Department of State Health Services website.

The daily number of new infections in the state of Texas was 10,791 on July 15, 2020, it dropped to a low of 1292 on September 27, 2020, and it has since risen to 10,826, on November 17, 2020, and is trending to rise even more. It is worth noting that daily new COVID-19 testings have been rising on average since August 23, 2020.

The daily number of fatalities from this virus in the state of Texas was peaked at 278 on July 23, 2020, it dropped to a low of 36 on September 27, 2020, and it has since risen to 81, officially on November 3, 2020. Currently, these numbers may be flattening out daily.

So, even though our daily number of new infections is the same as what it was on July 15, 2020, the daily number of fatalities is 29% of what it was on July 23, 2020. Indeed, every life is precious.

Concerning those under the age of 20 years old, they account for 7% of the state’s COVID-19 infections and for 0.2% of the state’s fatalities. In the state, 33 patients under the age of 20 have died from this virus; indeed, every life is precious.

The state positivity rate is currently less than 13%. The CDC has made it very clear that they want this number to be less than 10%. On July 16, 2020, this positivity rate had peaked at over 17%.

As of November 17, 2020, less than 12% of the state’s hospital beds are filled with COVID-19 patients. This has slightly increased over the past week, to 7841 COVID-19 patients, compared to 9781 patients on July 28, 2020. Currently, 19% of the state’s staffed hospital beds are available; however, on July 28, 2020, there were 23% of these beds available.

Concerning available ICU beds in the state, on November 17, 2020, there were 986 of these available, compared to July 28, 2020, when 1345 of these were available.

Concerning available ventilators in the state, on November 17, 2020, there were 7509 , but on July 28, 2020, there were 6073 available.

Indeed, there is reason to continue our current mitigation techniques. Thankfully, the state hospital systems are not over-run. We have got to wear masks when social distancing of six feet over time is too difficult, we have got to continue washing our hands many times daily, we have got to stay home if we are sick, and we should self-quarantine if we are exposed to anyone who is suspected of or who tests positive to the virus. Those who are most vulnerable need to stay home.

The responsibility with this lies with each one of us. Our national, state, and local leaders do not control if any person is diligent or not. That is up to each of us. This is a public health issue.

May we rely on our foundational sources of hope and strength; facts, logic, and faith.

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